Dirt-Live-Expo-Logo-6-26-13RENO, Nev. — While the exhibitor’s list continues to grow, final details are being put into place for next month’s salute to desert racing at the second annual Dirt Live Off-Road Expo. Named for the popular new weekly internet desert racing show Dirt LiveHD, the Dirt Live Off-Road Expo will be held July 10-12 on Virginia Street in the heart of Reno, Nev., in the shadow of the world-famous “Biggest Little City in the World” arch that helps illuminate the heart of the Reno’s resort corridor.

Downtown Reno will come alive as HDRA Racetown USA when the Dirt Live Off-Road Expo brings together desert racers, off-road enthusiasts, and exhibitors for three exciting action-packed days.

UNDER THE ARCH
Under the famous Virginia Street arch, the Dirt Live Off-Road Expo in the Northern Nevada gaming city will gather the competitors of the High Desert Racing Association, aficionados of desert racing, and enthusiasts of all kinds, in a summertime festival atmosphere around the Monster Energy Stage and in the BFGoodrich Tires Hospitality area.

Morgantown, W. Va. – Cancelling an event is neither an easy nor popular call, especially in the world of motorcycle racing. Racer Productions understands with the increased cost of travel and other expenses that it’s become a much harder task to get to the races every weekend. With that being said, Racer deeply appreciates the continued support and loyalty that racers, fans and sponsors have shown to the Grand National Cross Country Series over the years.

This weekend’s Indiana course quickly went from “really good to really bad in a heartbeat,” as XC1 Pro ATV racer Adam McGill stated on Saturday’s podium. The deluge began during Saturday’s PM race and continued throughout the night to create some of the most unfavorable conditions, even by cross-country standards. Public safety is the number one concern of Racer Productions, and after consulting with local public safety officials, the decision became clear to cancel the event for the day.

“I’ve been a racer for 22 years and I’ve seen a lot of bad stuff, but this would probably rank in the top three worst races I’ve seen,” said 8-Time GNCC Champion Barry Hawk, who also constructed the Indy 100 course. “It would have been easy for us to say after the ATVs that we couldn’t do it, but we didn’t. We went out there and did everything we could to salvage a course. The straw that broke the camel’s back was when the creek crossing became impassable, taking out over half the track that we had laid out,” Hawk added.

GNCC Racing is a unique form of competition in that its’ racers take pride in completing obstacles that may consist of mud, water, rocks, hill-climbs and other extreme challenges along the way. However, once those obstacles become engulfed with water, they become dangerous for racers of all skill levels. Had a rider needed medical assistance, it would have been impossible for the medical crew to reach the injured rider in the muddy conditions and the ambulance to leave the facility.

“By Sunday, the water had risen so high that it washed the pipe out that we had put in to cross the creek. So that left the track to be only 4 miles long for the big bikes, meaning that the Pros would’ve been coming around before the rest of them were off the line, causing a huge danger to everyone,” Hawk explained.

“It was a fiasco. People couldn’t get into the facility to park, ambulances weren’t able to enter or leave the premises, and the track was impassible in several places. As a racer myself, I am confidant we did the right thing by cancelling the race,” Hawk said.

If you signed up for a bike class at the Indy 100 and did not get a refund, you will automatically be put on the pre-entry list for the next GNCC event you choose to attend. This event is tentatively being rescheduled and will be posted as soon as a final decision has been made.

If you have any questions about the entry refund/credit process, please feel free to contact Racer Productions at 304-284-0084 or email info@gnccracing.com.

For more information on the series, visit www.gnccracing.com.

The SCORE Laughlin Desert Challenge is the first race of the five-event off-road desert race series, but more importantly it serves as a kick-start to a new year of off-road racing. New sponsor stickers are plastered over cars, some new teams are tackling different classes, and much like the New Year is for dieters hoping to shed a few pounds, this first event gives racers the hope of starting off a championship drive by winning the first race of the season.

The Laughlin Desert Challenge is unique to the longer, more tedious races SCORE puts on south of the border. This race, which is held at the Laughlin Event Park just off Casino Drive, features a 6.25-mile loop course. The event at one point consisted of two days of racing with each serving as individual events, but SCORE now combines the racing from both days to determing the overall winner. More on that when racing begins tomorrow.

Rod Hall Racing, which the team notes is the most winning family in Baja, announced the launch of the Hall USA #61 Trophy Truck at Estero Beach Resort in Ensenada just before the start of the 2010 Tecate SCORE Baja 1000.

The family hopes to bring their success in four-wheel drive stock racing into the Trophy Truck realm, as the family says “the Hall rally truck is 4WD and built to compete for overall wins in ANY off-road race in the world.”

The five-man Bonanza Plumbing/FMF/KTM Off-Road Racing Team went off the line this morning for the 43rd running of the Tecate SCORE Baja 1000.

For the past few months, the team has prepared their bodies and machine for the long 1000-mile trek on the KTM 530 XC-W. The Bonanza Plumbing/FMF/KTM team did a great deal of pre-race testing, including a 24-hour test ride to prepare for the race.

By now, most of the off-road community has heard of the tragic race accident at the MDR California 200 in Lucerne Valley, California. Due to the national coverage, there are probably quite a few people outside of the off-road community that have heard of the accident that took the lives of eight spectators and injured others. Even my mother, who went Jeeping for the first time this weekend but knows very little of off-roading, texted me to ask if I was at the race.

The event occurred on Federal land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), but the California Highway Patrol (CHP) took the lead on investigating the accident because of its magnitude. It’s unclear what they will uncover. MDR did have the proper approval to hold the race, but the BLM, which has also said it will investigate the accident, released a statement saying that MDR’s permit required racers to travel 15 mph or less when they were within 50 feet of fans, and allowed no more than 300 spectators for the event.