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Agua Dulce, Calif.:
The bikes and cars were on separate courses on day 4, but both had another tough day covering nearly 300 total miles. Typical of the Mexican 1000, there were some who dropped down in the standings, some who gained positions, and some who, despite their best efforts, remained locked in a tight battle with their nearest competitor.

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April 25, 2017 (Agua Dulce, Calif.):
Day 2 of the NORRA Mexican 1000 had both the bikes and the cars running south along the coast all the way to El Huerfanito before turning southwest towards highway one at Chapala. They run a transit stage down the highway until El Crucerito and the Mag 7 pit. The shared course then heads farther west in the dirt until it makes a split. The bikes continue southwest until they reach the Pacific coast. From there they head south until another splash of fuel in the Mag 7 pit on the highway. With still more miles to go, they make their way to the finish in Guerrero Negro. The day 2 total mileage for bikes was 270.80 miles.

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Day 1 of racing kicked off at the 50th anniversary of the NORRA Mexican 1000. Today’s course that travelled from Ensenada to San Felipe had a little bit of everything. Even before the bikes and cars left the line there was an incredible atmosphere. Watching every type and year of vehicle approach the line was a treat for anyone who loves offroad racing. So many unique vehicles compete in the Mexican 1000. Interesting bikes included the sidecar entry of Chris Kemp with monkey Joe Delucie, and the couple riding double again this year, Kevin and Michelle Busch.

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Agua Dulce, Calif.: Napier tents will be used by the NORRA Mexican 1000 crew during the 50th anniversary of the rally in 2017. NORRA crew members spend long hours in the desert scouting the course and providing assistance during the rally stages. Napier tents allow them to set up camp in minutes if need be, and begin relaxing after a long day. The NORRA crew puts in a lot of work, but it’s worth it. “The Happiest Race On Earth!” is entirely about having fun and creating memories that will last a lifetime. NORRA participants experience the most stunningly beautiful Baja scenery as they make their way down the entire length of the Baja Peninsula. After each day of racing, they have enough free time to experience a different location in Baja with friends and family. Each overnight stop has its own unique charm and character.

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(Agua Dulce, Calif.):
In an effort to improve the registration and planning process for 2017 competitors, NORRA is rolling out a new pre-registration program that will be launched on the NORRA website today at noon (PST) on Thursday, September 15th 2016.

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The Gentleman’s Guide to Racing (GGTR) has covered some of the biggest off-road desert races here in North America, and now the GGTR duo, made up of Michael “Skiny” Power and Cultural Attache Spanish Tony, has set its sites on the NORRA Mexican 1000.

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Ricky Johnson, Photo: Alex Soltero, Fotosolweb.com

(Agua Dulce, Calif.): The NORRA Mexican 1000 is an epic race that travels the length of the Baja Peninsula. Known as “The Happiest Race On Earth,” its rally based format is fun for those seeking adventure and challenging for those who relish competition. The event has classes for many different bikes which draws a diverse and talented bunch of riders. There could be no greater demonstration of that point than to look at this year’s top finishers.

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(Agua Dulce, Calif.):
The Bilstein Madonna trophy is recognized around the world as one of the most prestigious awards a racer can achieve. When Bilstein announced they would be presenting a Madonna and two sets of shocks at the 2016 NORRA Mexican 1000, many racers took note. The Mexican 1000 is a unique blend of high-performance driving, incredible scenery and world-class adventure in a tough, multi-stage race that honors the roots of Baja racing. Part of the criteria for earning the Madonna award was competing in an authentic vintage vehicle.

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Robby Gordon was fastest on day four of the Mexican 1000.

(San Jose Del Cabo, Baja California): The final stages of the NORRA Mexican 1000 were not merely a formality. Plenty of challenging terrain was in store for competitors as they made their way down the coast from La Paz to the finish in San Jose Del Cabo. Some pulled under the NORRA banner at the finish with hardly a scratch. Others limped in, dirty, broken and barely running. Most notable in its absence was the #72 Trophy Truck of Robert Acer. Acer’s V-drive gave out during the first special stage, leaving him miles from the finish line. Rear engine trucks have the back end of the engine pointing forward. The V-drive redirects the drive shaft back to the rear axle. Without it, the truck doesn’t move. The NORRA Mexican 1000 is the happiest race on earth but it’s also an extremely challenging test of endurance.

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Troy Herbst currently leads the cars at the 2016 NORRA Mexican 1000. Photo: Bink Design

(Bahía de Los Ángeles, Baja California): The opening stages of the NORRA Mexican 1000 were like beauty and the beast for competitors. Both the bikes, and the four wheeled competitors ran along the Pacific Coast; taking in spectacular scenery. The ocean contributed to the show with huge surf that crashed onto the jagged coastline. Just off shore, whales could be seen breaching out of the water. Much of the coast section runs along towering cliffs that drop to the surf below, but drivers got a chance to dip their treads into the water as they ran right on the sand in some spots. Don’t think that it was all fun in the sun; the beast would be found on the second half of the 456 mile long course. As they turned east and crossed the width of the peninsula on their way to the Bay of LA, there was plenty of silt and whoops to endure.