AMA-logo-230PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that demand for ethanol-related fuel probably isn’t enough to meet the requirements of federal law and changes may need to be made next year, the American Motorcyclist Association reports.

In a regulatory announcement released Aug. 6, “EPA Finalizes Renewable Fuel Standards,” the EPA said that for 2014 “the ability of the market to consume ethanol in higher blends such as E85 is highly constrained as a result of infrastructure- and market-related factors. EPA does not currently foresee a scenario in which the market could consume enough ethanol sold in blends greater than E10, and/or produce sufficient volumes of non-ethanol biofuels to meet the volumes of total renewable fuel and advanced biofuel as required by statute for 2014. Therefore, EPA anticipates that in the 2014 proposed rule we will propose adjustments to the 2014 volume requirements, including the advanced biofuel and total renewable fuel categories.”

AMA-logo-230PICKERINGTON, Ohio — American Motorcyclist Association Chair Maggie McNally and several U.S. lawmakers are scheduled to speak at the AMA E15 Fuel for Thought Lobby Day on Wednesday, June 19, at the nation’s capital.

The AMA is inviting all motorcyclists to take part in the Washington, D.C., event to help educate lawmakers about the need to research the possible harmful effects of E15 fuel on motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle engines.

E15 is a gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent ethanol by volume. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved its use in 2001-and-newer light-duty vehicles, which include cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles, none of the estimated 22 million motorcycles and ATVs currently in use are on the EPA approved list, and no manufacturer has approved E15 for use in its motorcycles and ATVs. Furthermore, use of E15 may void manufacturers warranties.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sent out a press release recently noting that it waived a limitation on selling fuel that is more than 10 percent ethanol for model year 2007 and newer cars and light trucks.This will allow fuel that contains up to 15 percent ehtanol (or E15) for most newer vehicles.

The waiving of this limitation signals the first of a number of actions that are needed to move toward commercializing E15 gasoline blends. According to the release, EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson made the decision after a review of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) extensive testing and other available data on E15’s impact on engine durability and emissions.