The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports that the lead law has finally been fixed.  On August 1, 2011, H.R. 2715 was introduced by U.S. Reps. Mary Bono Mack (R-CA), chair of the Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade and G.K. Butterfield (D-NC), ranking member of the same subcommittee. The bill would exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from the lead law that will effectively ban the machines at the end of the year.

The House of Representatives is expected to consider H.R. 2715 either today or tomorrow. Your support is critical. Please take action immediately to urge your Representative to vote yes on H.R. 2715.

As you may know, a similar bill, S. 1448, is under consideration by the U.S. Senate.

Both bills would provide the categorical exemption of youth OHVs as included in H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, which was introduced January 25 by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-MT). The riding community’s overwhelming support of H.R. 412 has helped contribute to the fast-tracking of these new bills.

H.R. 2715 would exempt youth OHVs from the lead-content provisions of the Consumer product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, otherwise known as the “lead law.” Those provisions contain overly restrictive lead-content limits that have practically destroyed the sale of youth OHVs and severely hampered youth motorized recreation.

The AMA and All-Terrain Vehicle Association (ATVA) applaud Reps. Bono Mack and Butterfield for introducing this bill and ask that you and anyone you know who cares about the future of kids motorized recreation call your Representative today to urge a ‘Yes’ vote for H.R. 2715.

Click here and enter your zip code for some talking points and the phone number for your Representative’s office.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires that all children’s products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed, the sale of youth-model motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles that do not conform to the CPSIA will be officially banned beginning in 2012.

Click here to call your Representative today and urge a ‘Yes’ vote for H.R. 2715. A prewritten e-mail is also available for you to send to your Representative by choosing the “Take Action” option and entering your information.

For more information on the CPSIA and everything the AMA has done on behalf of youth motorized recreation, please click here.

PICKERINGTON, Ohio – In a victory for off-highway vehicle (OHV) riders nationwide, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has reversed his position on his controversial new Wild Lands policy, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

In an announcement made June 1, Salazar said the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) wouldn’t designate any Wild Lands, which would have been managed as if they had received the restrictive Wilderness land-use designation from Congress.

Instead, Salazar said the BLM, which is a part of the Interior Department, will work in collaboration with members of Congress and others to identify public land that may be appropriate candidates for congressional protection under the Wilderness Act.

“We will focus our effort on building consensus around locally supported initiatives and working with members [of Congress] to advance their priorities for Wilderness designations in their states and districts,” he said.

Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO, said he was pleased by the news but cautioned that OHV riders must remain on guard.

“This is a major victory for motorcyclists and all-terrain vehicle riders and others concerned about appropriate access to public land,” Dingman said. “But we must remain vigilant. Anti-access groups will continue pushing for legislation to inappropriately close off millions of acres of public land to OHVs. Not only are BLM lands under attack by these groups, but U.S. Forest Service land as well.

“I want to thank all the AMA members and others who attended meetings and contacted their federal lawmakers to oppose the Wild Lands policy,” he added. “Your voices helped put pressure on Secretary Salazar to convince him to abandon his ill-conceived Wild Lands policy.”

In December, the AMA and OHV enthusiasts won an important battle for responsible riding on public land when U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) dropped his effort to pass a massive omnibus public lands bill that would have inappropriately designated millions of acres of public land as Wilderness, barring OHVs.

But then just days later, on Dec. 22, Salazar signed Secretarial Order 3310 creating the Wild Lands land-use designation that essentially allowed BLM officials to manage public land as if it had received a Wilderness designation from Congress, but without requiring congressional approval. This new policy was widely expected to restrict or eliminate responsible OHV use in the affected areas, and was seen to be orchestrated by anti-access groups to pull an end-run around Congress.

It also was expected to have a far-reaching impact because the BLM manages about 245 million acres of public land nationwide, primarily in 12 western states.

Federal lawmakers have considered the Wild Lands policy a “land grab” and a blatant attempt to usurp congressional authority. Off-highway riders sporting “Stop the Land Grab” stickers produced by the AMA and distributed by the Utah Shared Access Alliance (USA-ALL) turned out in droves for a meeting of Utah’s Governor’s Council on Balanced Resources that featured BLM Director Bob Abbey trying to explain the new policy.

Several governors were very vocal in their opposition to the Wild Lands policy as well, including Wyoming’s Matthew Mead, Idaho’s C.L. “Butch” Otter and Utah’s Gary Herbert.

Because of opposition from powerful federal lawmakers, governors, the AMA and other OHV enthusiasts, the Wild Lands policy hit a major snag on April 15.

That’s when President Obama signed into law the Fiscal Year 2011 Continuing Resolution — the funding measure that keeps the federal government operating through Sept. 30 – that included language barring the Interior Department from using any money to implement the Wild Lands land-use policy to manage land as if it had been designated as Wilderness.

A Wilderness designation is one of the strictest forms of public land management. Once Congress designates an area as Wilderness, nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation are illegal. The AMA supports appropriate Wilderness designations that meet the criteria established by Congress in 1964, but anti-access advocates have been abusing the legislative process to ban responsible OHV recreation on public land.

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — A key U.S. House subcommittee has approved legislation to address flaws in the law that effectively bans the sale of kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) at the end of the year, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

On May 12, the Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade approved and sent to the full Committee on Energy and Commerce the Enhancing CPSC Authority and Discretion Act (ECADA) of 2011 for further consideration.

The ECADA would exempt kids’ dirtbike and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) battery terminals from the lead-content limits of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is commonly known as the lead law. It may also allow exemptions to the lead-content portion of the law for OHV parts under certain conditions.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part.

“The ECADA is a step in the right direction,” said Ed Moreland, AMA senior vice president for government relations. “We are hopeful that the final legislation will fully address the problem with an outright exemption, like the one in H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act.”

Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), author of H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, said: “I appreciate the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade’s continued work to undo the consequences of the overreaching regulations created by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act. However, this legislation still does not go far enough in exempting youth-sized motorcycles and ATVs.

“H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, provides the necessary exemption for these vehicles and is the most common-sense approach to this issue,” he continued. “Montanans and folks across the country who enjoy these products are waiting for Congress to show leadership and exempt these products once and for all.”

The AMA will conduct an AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb on Thursday, May 26, at the nation’s Capitol in Washington, D.C., to help educate lawmakers about the need to change the CPSIA.

The event will promote the future of kids’ dirtbike and ATV riding, and scores of young riders and their families are expected to attend. The day will begin with a press event introducing the winner of a video contest to focus attention on the plight of children and families impacted by the CPSIA.

Following a screening of the winning “Kids Just Want To Ride!” video, all attendees will have the opportunity to meet with their congressional representatives to urge support for H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act.

For more information about the Kids Just Want to Ride Act and the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb, visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — A coalition of influential groups representing the interests of millions of off-highway vehicle (OHV) riders wants answers to key questions about the new federal Wild Lands policy, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

In a letter dated March 16 to Bob Abbey, director of the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the coalition asked numerous questions related to the Wild Lands policy, which could close millions of acres of federal land to responsible motorized recreation.

The coalition also stressed that there is strong grass-roots opposition to the new policy.

The coalition is made up of the AMA, the All-Terrain Vehicle Association, the Trails Preservation Alliance, the Colorado Off Highway Vehicle Coalition, the Utah Shared Access Alliance, AMA District 36 (Northern California, Northwestern Nevada), AMA District 37 Off-Road Division (Southern California) and the California Off-Road Vehicle Association.

On Dec. 22, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar signed Secretarial Order 3310 creating the Wild Lands land-use designation that essentially allows BLM officials to manage public land as if it had received a Wilderness designation from Congress, but without requiring congressional approval. This new policy is widely expected to restrict or eliminate responsible OHV use in the affected areas.

A Wilderness designation is one of the most restrictive forms of public land management. Once Congress designates an area as Wilderness, nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation are illegal. The AMA supports appropriate Wilderness designations that meet the criteria established by Congress in 1964, but anti-access advocates have been abusing the legislative process to ban responsible OHV recreation on public land.

“As associations that represent the interests of millions of responsible motorized recreation enthusiasts, we oppose the new Bureau of Land Management’s Wild Lands policy,” the coalition wrote. “We have questions concerning the definition of Wild Lands, designations, and implementation plans as they relate to motorized recreation within Secretarial Order 3310.

“Moreover, we seek to clarify indications that you believe there is no grass-roots opposition to this order,” the letter said. “We, the undersigned, believe this new designation may severely restrict the ability of our members to responsibly recreate on public lands managed by the BLM.”

To view the letter, click here: http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_Federal/20110316_Coalition_WildLands_Abbey.sflb.ashx?download=true.